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Home Eurosurveillance Edition  2012: Volume 17/ Issue 10 Article 7
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Eurosurveillance, Volume 17, Issue 10, 08 March 2012
News
The European Union summary report on trends and sources of zoonoses, zoonotic agents and food-borne outbreaks in 2010
  1. European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC), Stockholm, Sweden

Citation style for this article: Eurosurveillance editorial team. The European Union summary report on trends and sources of zoonoses, zoonotic agents and food-borne outbreaks in 2010. Euro Surveill. 2012;17(10):pii=20113. Available online: http://www.eurosurveillance.org/ViewArticle.aspx?ArticleId=20113

On 8 March 2012, the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) and the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) launched their annual report on zoonoses and food-borne outbreaks for 2010, the ‘European Union Summary Report on Trends and Sources of Zoonoses, Zoonotic Agents and Food-borne Outbreaks in 2010’ [1]. The report provides a comprehensive overview of zoonotic infections and disease outbreaks caused by consuming contaminated food. According to the report, 5,262 food-borne outbreaks were recorded in the European Union (EU), a slight reduction from 2009. Campylobacter, Salmonella and viruses such as norovirus were the most frequently reported causes of food-borne outbreaks.

In 2010, campylobacteriosis was the most commonly reported zoonosis. A total of 212,064 human cases were reported which constitutes an increase of 7 % compared with the figures reported in 2009. This is an increase for the fifth year running. Campylobacter was most often detected in fresh broiler meat.

A total of 99,020 salmonellosis cases in humans were reported in 2010 and the decreasing trend in case numbers continued from previous years – 108,618 cases were reported in 2009 [2]. This is a drop of nearly 9 % and marks a decrease for the sixth consecutive year. Most Member States met their Salmonella reduction targets for poultry, and Salmonella is declining in these populations. The report states that the most likely reason for the decrease is the successful adherence of Member States to the EU Salmonella control programmes for reducing the prevalence of the bacteria in poultry populations, especially in laying hens [3]. In foodstuffs, Salmonella was most often detected in fresh broiler and turkey meat.

The report also presents data on other food-borne diseases such as Shiga toxin/verotoxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC/VTEC). Human cases of STEC/VTEC have been increasing since 2008 - a total of 4,000 confirmed VTEC infections were reported in 2010.

The number of human listeriosis cases decreased slightly to 1,601.

The full version of the report covers a total of 15 zoonotic diseases including Q fever, brucellosis, bovine tuberculosis, rabies and the parasitic zoonosis echinococcosis.


References
  1. European Food Safety Authority. The European Union Summary Report on Trends and Sources of Zoonoses, Zoonotic Agents and Food-borne Outbreaks in 2010. EFSA Journal 2012;10(3):2597. Available from: http://www.efsa.europa.eu/en/efsajournal/doc/2597.pdf and http://ecdc.europa.eu/en/publications/Publications/1203-ECDC-EFSA-zoonoses-food-borne-report.pdf
  2. European Food Safety Authority. The European Union Summary Report on Trends and Sources of Zoonoses, Zoonotic Agents and Food-borne Outbreaks in 2009. EFSA Journal 2011;9(3):2090. Available from: http://www.efsa.europa.eu/en/efsajournal/doc/2090.pdf
  3. In accordance with Regulation (EC) No 2160/2003 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 17 November 2003 on the control of Salmonella and other specified food-borne zoonotic agents, Official Journal L 325/1, 12 Dec 2003, http://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=OJ:L:2003:325:0001:0015:EN:PDF these control programmes aim at reaching the Salmonella reduction target set by Regulations (EC) No 1003/2005, No 1168/2006 and No 646/2007 covering the following Salmonella types: S. Enteritidis, S. Typhimurium, S. Infantis, S. Virchow and S. Hadar in breeding flocks, and S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium in laying hen flocks, chickens and turkeys.


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