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Abstract

The SARS-CoV-2 Omicron variant has challenged demands to minimise workplace transmission in healthcare settings while maintaining adequate staffing. Policymakers have shortened COVID-19 isolation periods, although little real-world data have evaluated the utility. Our findings from surveillance of 240 healthcare workers from Sheffield Teaching Hospitals, England, show that 55% of affected staff could return before day 10 of isolation with over 25% eligible on day 6, pending two successive negative antigen tests. This outcome is favourable for continuity of healthcare services.

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/content/10.2807/1560-7917.ES.2022.27.11.2200164
2022-03-17
2022-12-08
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/10.2807/1560-7917.ES.2022.27.11.2200164
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